Don’t be so hard on yourself

Life is hard.  Like, really, really hard.  Work, bills, loss, stress…it all adds up.  Life is also beautiful.  Friends, family, kind deeds, thoughtful words, the beauty of a sunset.  It can all be beautiful.  It’s not one or the other.  It’s not so black and white.  But sometimes, it’s hard to see that.  When you’re on a high it’s hard to remember that life can have it’s downs.  And when you’re down, it’s hard to think you’ll ever get back to a happy, or even normal, place.

I try to be a positive person.  I am good at finding silver linings and positive twists on things.  And I try to share that positivity, both on this blog and with people I know.  But it’s also really easy for me to go to a negative place.  You know, the place that’s filled with “I can’ts” and “I miss” and all the other things that one should try to keep at bay.  But, why should you keep those negative thoughts away?  If you ignore the negative I think they creep back up and overwhelm you.  And it’s easier to swim in the shallow end of a pool than in a tsunami.  (I don’t know if that exactly made sense, but I think you’re getting what I’m saying.)

Loss of mobility is hard to deal with.  Yes, I can adapt (and have) pretty well.  But it’s still tough.  There are things I can’t do anymore.  That’s something I have accepted.  I do my best to find a positive side to things I can’t do (i.e. I can’t walk, but at least I don’t fall and scrape my knees up like I used to) when I can.  But there are still times when the sadness creeps up and I get emotional.  And then I look at everything I can do and recover from the sadness.

Recently I wrote an article for a magazine and I tried to cover this very topic in it.  I talked about how the first time my son went in a pool, I wasn’t able to be in it with him.  We were at my aunt’s house for a family party and there is no lift at her house.  My husband and mom took my son in the pool and baby boy had a blast!  But it was really, really hard for me to not be a part of that.  Sure, I could have gotten in the pool (you know, gravity) but it would have been hard to get out (again, gravity).  And then it would have been about me and my safety which would have taken away from the Little Mister’s first pool experience.  In the article I wrote about how sometimes you just have to accept that there are some things you can’t do and find ways to turn them into a positive.  In the pool example, I mentioned that I took one million photos of the Little Mister in the pool to commemorate his first swim.  If I had been in the pool we would have missed out on those photos.  See, positive outlook!  I was still super sad, but at least there was some positivity that allowed me to move on and not be overwhelmed.

The editor told me that I was being negative and said something along the lines of “where is your can-do attitude?! There are public pools with lifts that you can use.” That wasn’t the point.  I do use public pools with lifts.  I love swimming.  I’m part mermaid.  And I appreciate that the editor wants to portray a positive image.  But the point is that I was in a place that didn’t have a lift and I missed out and I was sad.  But I dealt with it and moved on.

And I guess the point of this blog is that if all people do is portray positivity it makes the people going through hard times feel alone.  Or misunderstood.  Or unrelateable.  We all have down days.  We all have things that hit us the wrong way and make us sad.  It’s human nature.  And when you have a disability there are things that will come up that you can’t do that will make you sad.  And yes, there are ways to adapt.  But sometimes that isn’t an option.  And to ignore this publicly is to make others feel that they are all alone.  I’m here to say that you are not alone.  We all struggle at times.  We all get down at times.  And, even when you’re in the thick of it and feel that life is going to overwhelm you, it will get better.

And acknowledging that isn’t negative. It’s real.